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Looking for Online Courses by Paul Ferraresi

In today’s society one must keep learning. Plus getting educated on something new is always an adrenaline shot to me.

Here is a listing of some places to start your search. Happy learning.

THE GREAT COURSES
The site offers 500-plus courses. Most lectures are about 30 minutes, and courses range from 6 to 96 lectures (most in the 24 to 36 range). Courses can be purchased as online modules or on DVDs or CDs. Prices generally range from $15 to $230. There’s also a subscription plan called the Great Courses Plus (thegreatcoursesplus.com), with access to multiple courses for $19.95 a month or $179.95 annually. Amazon Prime also offers a menu of Great Courses for $7.99 per month.

BIG THINK
Topics range from business and technology to health and entertainment. Instructors include such well-known experts as fitness guru Jillian Michaels and Bill Nye “the Science Guy”. Every week there’s a new 45 to 60 minute podcast on a different subject, plus articles and videos, all free. For a fee there’s also Big Think Edge for professional and business development.

UNIVERAL CLASS
History, DIY projects and cooking are some of the courses available. Students can earn continuing educational units, which certify professional development in some fields. Average time commitment is 10 to 20 hours, including class time, assignments and exams. Pricing ranges from $59 for one month of unlimited courses and certification to $189 for a year of unlimited courses.

YALE UNIVERSITY
Professors from this school offer an array of free courses, from the liberal arts to sciences, on YouTube and at Open Yale Courses (oyc.yale.edu). Lectures are supplemented with syllabi, transcripts and other resources. Sorry, no Ivy League credit, though.

EDX
Developed by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, edX (edx.org) strives to make higher education available to more people. Time commitments range from about 45 minutes for a single lecture to 2 to 3 hours a week for up to 12 weeks. Most courses are free.

LOOKING FOR ONLINE COURSES

Looking for Online Courses by Paul Ferraresi

In today’s society one must keep learning. Plus getting educated on something new is always an adrenaline shot to me.

Here is a listing of some places to start your search. Happy learning.

THE GREAT COURSES
The site offers 500-plus courses. Most lectures are about 30 minutes, and courses range from 6 to 96 lectures (most in the 24 to 36 range). Courses can be purchased as online modules or on DVDs or CDs. Prices generally range from $15 to $230. There’s also a subscription plan called the Great Courses Plus (thegreatcoursesplus.com), with access to multiple courses for $19.95 a month or $179.95 annually. Amazon Prime also offers a menu of Great Courses for $7.99 per month.

BIG THINK
Topics range from business and technology to health and entertainment. Instructors include such well-known experts as fitness guru Jillian Michaels and Bill Nye “the Science Guy”. Every week there’s a new 45 to 60 minute podcast on a different subject, plus articles and videos, all free. For a fee there’s also Big Think Edge for professional and business development.

UNIVERAL CLASS
History, DIY projects and cooking are some of the courses available. Students can earn continuing educational units, which certify professional development in some fields. Average time commitment is 10 to 20 hours, including class time, assignments and exams. Pricing ranges from $59 for one month of unlimited courses and certification to $189 for a year of unlimited courses.

YALE UNIVERSITY
Professors from this school offer an array of free courses, from the liberal arts to sciences, on YouTube and at Open Yale Courses (oyc.yale.edu). Lectures are supplemented with syllabi, transcripts and other resources. Sorry, no Ivy League credit, though.

EDX
Developed by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, edX (edx.org) strives to make higher education available to more people. Time commitments range from about 45 minutes for a single lecture to 2 to 3 hours a week for up to 12 weeks. Most courses are free.

A FATAL IRA ROLLOVER ERROR by Paul Ferraresi

Only one 60 day IRA- to- IRA rollover can be done per year by an individual, regardless of how many IRAs he or she holds.

In the past, the IRS believed the rule applied separately to each IRA, but that is no longer the case. The new IRS publications make it clear that the rule now applies in the aggregate to all IRAs.

The once per year IRA rollover rule also does not apply to rollovers from other types of plans to IRAs, to rollovers from IRAs back to plans or to Roth conversions.

Further, the rule does not apply to non-spouse IRA beneficiaries, because they can never do a 60 day rollover anyway. Non-spouse IRA beneficiaries can move inherited IRA funds only using direct transfers. A spouse can do a rollover, but after a spouse’s death, spousal rollovers should also be done as direct transfers.

INDIRECT ROLLOVERS

A 60 day rollover means that the funds were withdrawn by the IRA owner via a check made out to the owner personally. By contrast, a direct transfer involves a trustee-to-trustee movement, in which the money moves directly from one IRA to another without anyone touching the money in between.

IRS Announcement 2014-32 makes it clear that a check made out to the receiving IRA will qualify as direct transfer and is not subject to the once-per-years IRA rollover rule. But a check made out to the IRA owner will not qualify for this exception because he or she can cash this check.

The rule now states that only one IRA-to-IRA rollover can be done per year from all IRAs held by an individual including SEPs, Simple IRAs and Roth IRAs. Note that one year means 365 days, not a calendar year.

If one does make another transfer, that will be an ineligible rollover and taxable to the extent of pretax funds withdrawn.

The transfer will also be subject to 10% early distribution penalty if one is under age 59 ½, and no exception to the 10% penalty applies here.

The action could also be subject to a 6% excess IRA contribution penalty if the ineligible rollover is not removed in a timely manner.

All of these IRA problems can be avoided by using only direct transfers. Direct transfers are not subject to this rule. An unlimited number of direct IRA transfers can be done.

Protected: IRA MISTAKES ON RMD – PART 1 by Paul Ferraresi

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WHAT THE RISE OF ROBO–CARS MEANS FOR EVERYTHING ELSE Recommended by Paul Ferraresi

Adam Smith wrote about the “Invisible Hand” in 1776 explaining about the free market economy.

Later in 1942 Joseph Schumpeter wrote about “creative destruction” as free market’s way of delivering progress.

Both of these economic principles were presented beautifully in a May 20, 2017 article in Barron’s. The title, What the Rise of Robo–Cars Means for Everything Else.

http://www.barrons.com/articles/how-robo-cars-will-impact-everything-else-1495858783