Ways to Save $,Part 2

Here are a few other ways to save some money:

* Buy pills and split them. Ask your doctor if it is cheaper to get half the amount of double strength medication than normal strength. Then split each pill into two doses with a $5 device.

*Buy refilled ink cartridges. In many cases you pay $20 for a refilled version versus $80 for a new one.

*Vacation in a dorm room. Colleges overseas rent summer dorm rooms. Savings can be substantial. Go to: Universityrooms.com

*Take a defensive driving course. Many auto insurers will drop 10% off your annual premium. Call them before attending class to see if it is worthwhile.

*Market old Electronics. Once popular items have become collectables. See EBAY for prices. A first generation IPOD was selling for $150.

*Raise your deductible . If you raise your homeowner policy from $500 to $1000 you could save 25%. The rule is a payback in 8 years. So, if you increase deductible by $500 the premium savings needs to be at least $60 per year.

Hope this helps. Remember any money saved is not spent. Invest it for your future!

Ways to Save $$$ , Part 1

* Sell to Amazon. They accept a slew of old items like videogames, books and Kindle Readers for trade-in, or, in exchange for a gift card. Check out the Trade-In Store. If listed, then print out the shipping label and send it.

* Get Free E-books. Download 60,000 public domain E-books at Gutenberg.org

* Mulch for Free. Google your County name and “free mulch” or ‘free compost” to see if it is offered.

* Dine for less. Restaurant.com offers discounted gift certificates.

* Call before you pay. Banks and Credit Card companies will usually waive a rare late payment fee. That can save you $35-$39.

* Skip Rental Car Insurance. Check with your Carrier first to see if you are covered adequately. Most times your Auto Policy covers the use of Rental cars. Save a bundle each time you rent.

Now , you know me. With these savings Don’t Spend it ,rather, invest the savings for your future

Before you Leave for that Vacation

Some tips:
* Run your garbage disposal with lemon rinds and cold water. This will avoid a smelly homecoming

* Pause your mail delivery. Piled up mail is a sign that no one is home. Go to: holdmail.usps.com/holdmail. Pick it up or have it delivered when you return.

* Unplug unused appliances. To save on electricity pull the plug on microwaves, coffee makers and any appliances that draw power to run a clock.

* Thwart potential thieves by having a security sign outside( although a security system is best). Also, toss gravel on the ground near entries as it is noisy.

* Check social media. Do NOT post to the world that you are leaving or send photos while you are away. Wait to share when you return.

Have a fun and safe time.

How to Save Money on Home and Auto Insurance

Four ideas to save on your home or auto coverage:

1) Contact your agent when you retire or get laid off as you stop driving 20 miles or more to and from work. There is a discount for driving fewer miles

2) Insure your identity. It is available as a rider on many homeowner policies for about $25. Your insurer will work with police and credit bureaus to restore your name, and, reimburse costs related to restoring your credit.

3) Save around $100 per year with some insurance companies by installing a tracking device to monitor your driving habits.( for some of you this may end up costing your more :) )

4) Before you file a claim, talk with your agent to make sure it is valid. Some things are not covered and a bad claim in the database could make it tougher to file a later claim

Hope this helps….

Do you really need Life Insurance by Paul Ferraresi

Let’s face it. Most people put off buying life insurance for any number of reasons. Take a look at this list—do any of them sound like you?
1. It’s too expensive. In the ever-burgeoning budget of having a family, things like day care and car payments and possibly even college tuition eat up a good chunk of the money each month, and a lot of people think that life insurance is just outside those “necessities” when money’s tight. But two things: life insurance is often not nearly as expensive as you might think, especially when you can get a good policy for less than the cost of a daily cup of coffee at the local café, and well, if money’s tight now, what if something happens to you?
People with no life insurance overestimate its cost by three times. And even those who have coverage, overestimate its cost by two times.1 While it is an expense that you have
to budget for imagine what the financial impact would be
for your family if something were to happen to you and you had no life insurance coverage at all.
2. That’s that stuff for babies and old people, right?
Funny, recent surveys show that 71% of people say they personally need life insurance ,yet, only 51% have coverage.
3. I’m strong and healthy! You eat right, you stay active, and everyone admires how grounded and centered
you are. You passed your last physical with flying colors! That’s GREAT! But you’re neither immortal nor
indestructible. It’s not even that something could happen to you—though it could—so much as when you’re at your strongest and healthiest, there’s no better time to get a policy to protect your loved ones. If you fall
seriously ill or suffer significant injury later, it will make it tougher to get that kind of policy, if any at all.
4. I have life insurance through my job. Many people are offered life insurance as part of their employee
benefit coverage—and often, it’s the first time they encounter life insurance and have no idea that a $50,000
policy, or one or two times their salary, isn’t as much as they think it is. It sounds like a lot of money (and it
is!), until you realize that it has to cover some or all of the expenses for your loved ones in your absence. Plus,
if you leave the job, it’s typically the type of insurance that doesn’t “move on” with you.

5. I don’t have kids. Sure, kids are a big reason why some people get life insurance. But that’s not the only
litmus test for needing protection. If there is anyone in your life who would suffer financially from your loss—
your spouse or live-in partner, a sibling, even your parents—a life insurance policy goes a long way in making sure everyone’s still okay even if something happens to you.
6. Life insurance—it’s on my list… eventually. There’s no deadline on life insurance, no mandate from the government on purchasing it. Your parents may have never talked to you about its importance, and it’s certainly not the most invigorating topic for conversation. But don’t let your “eventually” turn into your loved ones’ “if only.”
If any of this sounds daunting, just know that it doesn’t have to be. Be sure to talk things through with your
Insurance agent. Your financial professional will help you figure out how much you may need, and find a policy that fits into your budget. There’s a policy to fit every budget, and a life insurance agent can help you find coverage that’s right for you.
Information for this article was provided by Life Happens, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping consumers make smart insurance decisions to safeguard their families’ financial futures:
www.lifehappens.org.
The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide
specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investments or products may be appropriate for you, consult with your financial professional.